Cornwall Street Affordable Housing | KO&Co Architecture | Photographer: Kate Mathieson Photography
2021 Queensland State Commendation for Multiple Housing Architecture | Ko&Co Architecture | Photographer: Kate Mathieson

QUEENSLAND SHORTLIST
RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURE
Category
MULTIPLE HOUSING

Introducing the Shortlist for RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURE (MULTIPLE)

The following projects have been shortlisted for the 2022 Queensland Architectural Awards, in the Residential (Multiple) Category. This page will continue to list shortlisted project until the last of the 2022 Queensland Regional Events have concluded in Townsville on the 10th of June 2022. The result of the 2022 Queensland Architecture awards will be revealed via livestream, which will be shown at the presentation event on the 24th of June 2022 at the State Library of Queensland, and also available via Youtube.

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Anne Street Garden Villas

In collaboration with the Queensland Government, this project was a unique opportunity to challenge the conventions of social housing, and a more create more liveable, forward-thinking model. Our aim was to employ small design moves that could have a big impact, and offer a more efficient alternative to single dwelling living without sacrificing the amenity offered by freestanding homes.

Design workshops with current tenants informed our design approach, and the resulting development strives to make a positive contribution to the neighbourhood. The design prioritises pedestrian scale movement and provides opportunities to engage with the broader neighbourhood. The bulk and scale of the built form is retrained and the aesthetic responds to local contextual studies.

Small, efficient dwelling footprints kept costs down, and created space for a shared outdoor garden, which is key to both the social sustainability of the project and passive design moves across the site.

By Anna O’Gorman Architect

Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones

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Through the use of a simple palette of robust materials, the design responds to the surrounding context and scale with single storey individual villas and their cheery pop of colour fronting the streetscape.  The apartments and carparking are nestled behind, mirroring the scale of the adjacent residential.  Within the centre of the development is the protected natural heart, providing social respite and connection interwoven with the biophilic design to direct and treat stormwater flows.  Each design element used has a duality that responds to the social, climactic, safety and autonomy needs of the use.  Consideration of privacy, personalisation, access and connection provide the residents with a self-directed sense of both independence and community.   

Marlin Villas

The Marlin Villas are a contemporary expression of suburban infill development for a high-end southern Gold Coast property. As a pair of free-standing villas, the design utilises the buildings separation to enhance passive solar qualities of natural light and harnessing of coastal breezes which was particularly important for the south facing site.

Internally, the design is orientated around a central void. Split-levels are connected within the void via a labyrinth of stairs and gangways. The middle floor is positioned to be floating within the volume of the void, demonstrating visual connectivity between all living spaces and the canal. The ability to live and entertain with a close relationship to the canal was highly desired by the client.

Open circulation spaces, defined roof form, cleverly placed windows and sub-tropical landscaping encourage cool breezes and enhance visual connection between indoor and outdoor.

By Shane Denman Architects

Photography by Andy Macpherson Studio, Kristian Philipp and Desire Media

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Citation:

Responding to its south-west facing waterfront suburban context, on the main canal at Palm Beach, the development is characterised by a material simplicity. The scale of the street façade is mitigated with various architectural devices that together provide a rich architectural response. Clever internal planning, with its perfectly considered scale create spaces that are inviting, providing a generous response to a subtropical climate and a joy for the residents. The interaction of the living spaces with courtyard gardens and a waterfront plunge pool results in a calming, peaceful environment.

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Norfolk, Burleigh Heads

Norfolk drew inspiration from the Norfolk Pine’s pinecone, which closes to protect its seeds and opens when the weather and settings are optimum. In the same way, Norfolk’s adaptable architecture suits the ever-evolving coastal environment.

Norfolk is confident, sculptural and elegantly realised at every angle. It is designed to touch lightly on its site. To give residents the sense of being more outside than in, with sliding screens for adaptable shading and endless glazing that draws the beach into every living space.

“We wanted to design something that celebrated the site,” explains architect, Koichi Takada. “When you open the doors to the terraces, you have that feeling of being at one with the elements.” Takada enjoys seeing the way residents position the screens depending on the time of day and amount of sun. “The façades are continually animated, not dissimilar to the way nature performs,” he says.

By Koichi Takada Architects

Photography by Scott Burrows

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A HIGHLY crafted response, demonstrating dedication to the detail.  Positioned in a landmark location, the project successfully strikes a balance between the functions of ‘public sculpture’ and resident autonomy.  The strength of the conceptual framework and its application through the detail achieves a fluid, fine form and a lightness not often achieved in projects of this scale.  Hanging planting and moveable screens encompass the simple planning, tailored to make the most of the Gold Coast beach lifestyle in which it is embedded.  

Hawthorne Siblings

Hawthorne Siblings is a unique micro-lot densification development consisting of a house renovation and construction of a new pair of compact freehold houses addressing the ‘missing middle’ in Brisbane’s housing market
Hawthorne Siblings are conceived as a pair of strident long weatherboard clad rectilinear volumes emphasizing a simple gable roof and a large open, flexible ‘undercroft-like’ ground floor plan.
The micro-lot plan invites the outside in accentuating strong connections to landscape and streetscape through oversized structurally glazed openings located on the North and East facades. A triple height void also allows access to a secluded rooftop terrace with views of the surrounding suburbs.
The project exemplifies how small foot-print projects can better offer densification solutions in our cities through re-evaluation of town planning policies and clever architectural interventions that make reference to the immediate local vernacular yet manifest in a contemporary interpretation, fitting the housing demands of the 21st century.

By REFRESH*DESIGN

Photography by Scott Burrows

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The jury was impressed with these two houses. The planning solution is exceptional. They work well contextually in the street helped by a favourable site orientation, but they also demonstrate that small lot housing when designed well can be a successful solution to increasing density with little impact. The well resolved planning also delivered high quality amenity for its occupants with the use of a skylight cutting through the length of the building that brings light to the inside. The houses present to the street as small cottage forms hiding an almost three storey internal programme that provides a surprising variety of spaces. A collaboration with the client’s steel and glass business has contributed positively to the material and detail resolution of the houses. The layout and engagement of the house with the private outdoor space was phenomenally successful in controlling environmental elements such as daylight and breeze.

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UQ Res Kev Carmody House

Named after celebrated Indigenous musician, Kev Carmody House sits atop a prominent hill within the St Lucia campus. 610 student rooms are arranged within community groups, with a generous proportion of common space providing a variety of functions, scale, and character. These spaces create a welcoming and vibrant experience which is active, social, and connected to the landscape, offering a uniquely Queensland way of life for students as a memorable home away from home.

The urban planning defines a series of landscape spaces which are framed through site linkages and vistas as a civic gesture, connecting the original ‘front yard’ of Cairngorm, the original Queenslander, to the eastern aperture framing Great Court beyond.

Materiality echoes the St Lucia campus, expressed through robust finishes referencing the tonal variations in the sandstone. The façade is animated with light and shade and creates a dynamic contribution to the campus built environment.

By nettletontribe

Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones

Citation:

The Jury was impressed with this building on a number of levels. The building provided a successful demonstration of how to house a large number of students efficiently and effectively while still providing a sense of community.  The individual sleeping spaces are very small but carefully detailed. The common spaces are well handled particularly at ground floor level, in particular the spaces for students preparing cooking and eating their meals are very well resolved.  The integration of the adjacent Cairngorm building and it’s garden into the scheme as a student space connects the students with a “traditional” Queensland architectural experience with respect to the existing building and it’s west facing garden. The Jury was impressed with the exterior of the building and how well it integrated itself into the University of Queensland campus.  The colour scheme of creams and purples is surprisingly effective as it picks up found colours on the University Campus. 

The quality and strong character of Kev Carmody House should contribute to a positive and memorable experience of living on campus for the future UQ Alumni who grace its halls.