Beck Street | LineburgWang | Photographer: Christopher Frederick Jones
2021 Elina Mottram Award for Residential Architecture - Houses (Alterations and Additions) | Beck Street | LINEBURGWANG | Photographer: Christopher Frederick Jones

QUEENSLAND SHORTLIST
RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURE
Category
ALTERATIONS AND ADDITIONS

Introducing the Shortlist for RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURE (ALTS & ADDS)

The following projects have been shortlisted for the 2022 Queensland Architectural Awards, in the Residential (Alts & Adds) Category. This page will continue to list shortlisted project until the last of the 2022 Queensland Regional Events have concluded in Townsville on the 10th of June 2022. The result of the 2022 Queensland Architecture awards will be revealed via livestream, which will be shown at the presentation event on the 24th of June 2022 at the State Library of Queensland, and also available via Youtube.

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Currumbin Waters House

Currumbin Waters House is the renovation of a single storey 1989 AV Jennings Display Home which sits on a shared title with the other three house models along a common driveway.

A set of small deletions have been used to open the house up along its North/South and East/West axes to introduce breeze and light to the interior. Simple structures are then used on the boundaries to give a much more generous sense of space and bring the outside in.

Brick elements are retained to provide a memory of the original plan and to stretch the interior into the landscape. Simple paling ‘fence’ structures manage privacy and create an extended pedestrian threshold along the shared boundary.

We’re hoping this project can set an example for a budget conscious re-purposing of this building typology on the Gold Coast that will allow a much more sustainable, connected and conscious way of living.

By Nielsen Jenkins

Photography by Nikolas Strugar

Citation:

A sense of arrival and discovery leads to a careful extraction at the core of the existing dwelling.  A delightful exterior addition responds to nature ‘as a room’ expanding the use of the home, not just the footprint. Manipulation of the existing has enhanced and framed a creative solution, informed by the practicalities and aspirations of today’s family life as well as its all too real budgetary constraints.  An appropriate, functional, and humble response to the brick and tile typology of the Gold Coast’s 1980s stock housing.  Sustainability is underwritten through reuse, reconfiguration, and a creative reimagining both inside and out.

Noosa Heads House

Noosa Heads House is a functional, robust and comfortable retreat that attempts to connect its occupants with their coastal setting and celebrate the sub-tropical climate of the region.

While limited in scope, these renovations to an existing brick house have been carefully calibrated to ‘remake’ the experience of occupying the building and to transform the appearance of the existing structure.

By Vokes and Peters 

Photography By Christopher Frederick Jones

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Citation:

In a rare proposition for housing in this location the Noosa Heads House re-interprets the alterations and additions paradigm. The formal gesture of arrival and gathering, expressed in the two storey screened parti engages with the street and centres around the internal ‘formal public room’ and simple utilitarian kitchen that dispenses with the usual accretion of joinery.   The conceptual framework of unfolding contiguous space moves from public to private through rise and fall in section, in a masterfully crafted, materially restrained and unique formal expression of the sunshine coast vernacular. Manipulative instruments of incision, subtraction and addition, deployed with elegant restraint, evolves principles of resilience and sustainability, benchmarking the value in adaptation of our current building stock.

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Bath House

The Bath House project exudes character and personality perfectly reflecting the owner of the property. Through a common understanding and enthusiasm, architect and client worked together to revitalise an original beach house and extend its life expectancy with practical yet elegant solutions.

By Kelly Martin Architecture 

Photography by Corey Schweikert Photography

Citation:

An existing beach house (wholly retained) with a modest budget and a strong client/architect relationship are immediately evident in the restrained and delightful marrying of cross cultural nuance; Japanese Buddhist aesthetic and subtropical living, resulting in a rich and detailed architectural response of subtle intervention and a clear planning regime. The simple gesture in extension of the existing platform amplifies the liminal experience and connections to nature providing prospect and refuge for the inhabitants.  The clarity of thinking and resultant execution of this modest extension serendipitously expresses the value and generosity of small footprint living and subtropical cross cultural nuance.

Green House

The Green House was for the client an example of making a difference one project at a time. Sustainability on many levels was at the forefront in consideration and has brought a sense of purpose, comfort and responsibility to the design, however the projects main role of a home was paramount bringing order, elegance and grave to everyday living.

On a 200sqm site this home consists of living spaces curtained by cascading perimeter planter boxes softening the composition. On the ground floor the brass top kitchen folds out to an explosive outdoor room with a rear sunken yard beyond. Upstairs bedrooms and bathrooms reside with robust interior finished dominated with grey ironbark surfaces and recycled hardwood framing. Fabricated from steel plate, the main staircase’s mid-landing dynamically cantilevers towards the street with three sides in-filled with louvers to function as the lungs of the house.

By Steendijk

Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones

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Citation:

The Green House by Steendijk is an ambitious and skilful reworking of a humble Spring Hill workers cottage.  The need to rebuild the bulk of the house was taken to craft a new meticulous and rich interior world with an expansive connection to a new walled garden that belies the 200sqm site area.  A spaciousness and variety has been achieved despite the tiny floor plan with each room and space having its own character and engagement with the exterior. Thoughtful reuse of hardwood members combined with climatically responsive design and onsite power and water harvesting further demonstrate how historic fabric can be reimagined for contemporary times.

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Cascade House

A 1900s timber cottage sits on a wide but shallow site with a small addition added to the side. The addition visually recedes, separated by courtyard and landscape, leaving the original cottage sitting proudly to the street. The addition becomes the more public parts of the house. It is broken up into a series of split levels to mediate a large topography change across the site. A place to gather for meals and games opens onto on grass and across pool. A lounge and breezeway connect the extension to the cottage which now contains the private bedroom & bathroom spaces. The pitch of the verandah roof is extended over the cascading split levels below, protecting them from the afternoon western sun. Moving across the linking breezeway, the new extension sits below eye level, editing out the foreground, and allowing an uninterrupted outlook to the sunset, valley, and hills.

By John Ellway

Photography by Toby Scott

Citation:

The Cascade House demonstrates the way in which modest and highly disciplined interventions can yield generous and joyful outcomes.  Despite constraining the addition to the limited land immediately adjacent to the existing Queenslander, the works address entry, street engagement and western sun mitigation in an extension that provides new spatial types not available in the existing cottage.  With interventions to the cottage minimised,  the maximum potential of the budget was realised and the existing fabric and street connection of the cottage respected.  This project is a wonderful example of how less can be more and how good design can benefit not only the owners but the neighbourhood.

Toowong Renovation

The client’s love for their post-war cottage and garden on 405m2 guided the decision to make small insertion / big impact moves. The strategy to bring living areas to ground level maintained the desired small-footprint house while preserving the cottage and its street frontage. Contemporary kitchen, dining and living areas wrap and spill onto an open-air courtyard which brings depth to the landscape. By creating a stronger engagement with the outdoors, the architecture improves a sense of connection to the place, landscape and climate of Brisbane.

Toowong renovation explores ways to engage the street and garden to foster community and family togetherness. The architecture preserves the relationship between the post-war cottage and street while forging improved connections between contemporary social spaces and backyard. Together these strategies promote a sense of belonging and improve wellbeing.

By KIN Architects

Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones

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Citation:

The typical inner city renovation radically expands the floor area of a cottage by building in under together with extension to the rear.  In the case of Toowong House this planning strategy has been expanded to include a double height void that integrates the new grounded living spaces with the original cottage.  The double height living space is coupled with a dramatic garden room which together provide a delightful generosity that belies the modest footprint of the extension.  A central staircase further unite the two levels at the same time as visually connecting the living area to the active laneway on which the house is situated and where kids play and neighbours meet.  This project is commended as a demonstration of a compact reworking of modest cottage into a practical spatially generous family home that celebrates both the street and the backyard.

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Ashgrove Hillside House

A home in the trees – elevated and surrounded by wattle, gum trees and grevilleas ,this renovation responded to the steep site with a terraced series of spaces culminating in a new bedroom and study level which look up the mountain to the north and view Mt Coot-tha to the south.

The new spaces provide places that allow the family to live, sit and entertain which emphasise a connection to the landscape beyond. These restrained new insertions to the house, minimal palette and carefully captured connections to the surrounding site aim to strengthen a quiet sense of ‘place’ amongst the whirlwind of family life.

By Kieron Gait Architects

Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones

Citation:

The Ashgrove Hillside House radically opens up an introverted 90s house and embraces the available views.    Following the client dictum of minimum demolition the extension is skilfully grafted onto the existing structure and plugged into the difficult 45 degree circulation.  In contrast to the rather confusing the original internal planning the new works creates dramatic new circulation routes between the new and existing terraces and levels. The project is a wonderful example of the way in which a house that belongs to an era where size and ostentation were the priority can be reimagined as a celebration of its sites potential and an embrace of outdoor living.

House for New Farm

This renovation to a California bungalow home is imagined as a private oasis to contrast day-to-day urban life. The existing house was raised slightly so additional rooms could be built, allowing the gardens to be maximised. The ground level living rooms were imagined as surrounded by gardens, much like you might a find in a rural setting. The design seeks to reconsider the typically grounded California bungalow typology as a sub-tropical and private garden pavilion

By Marc&co

Photography by Andy MacPherson

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Citation:

The House for New Farm has elevated the original California Bungalow to create a generous breezy family home immersed in the retained generous garden.  The new lower living area of the house takes full advantage of the relatively private walled garden established with the entire perimeter dramatically opening up via full height doors. These are provided with excellent weather and sun protection via the verandahs above.  A generous light filled sculptural double height internal void connects the living spaces with the upper bedroom zone in a fun theatrical way.  This project is commended for providing an example of good climatically responsive design by getting the basics right – excellent 24/7 passive ventilation enabled by a line of security and protection from the elements.

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Frangipani Pavilion

Frangipani Pavilion was conceived as a permeable outdoor room, that through considered siting and orientation, defines new garden spaces, like the embracing crook of an arm. The verdant courtyard that has been created now provides a central focus to both the original house and the new pavilion and offering a sanctuary. The additional intervention of a new crafted bay window to the existing living room, creates an expanded habitable threshold and establishes a dialogue between the old and new structures and celebrates the occupation of the edge. At night the pavilion becomes a lantern that floats in the landscape providing an alternate engagement and experience.

By Arcke

Photography by Andy Macpherson

Citation:

This simple but elegant restrained response to a typical client request for more floor area has enabled the owners of an internalised project home to embrace the garden and live life outdoors.  In lieu of more internal floor area, a new pavilion has been coupled with a new bay window and screening to make a special garden court.  Positioning of the pavilion and the associated planting additionally provide privacy from a new high density housing development adjacent.  We commend this project for its demonstration of how simple thoughtful design interventions can be transformational.