2021 Winner of The Eddie Oribin Award for Building of the Year | Cairns Performing Arts Centre | CA Architects and Cox Architecture | Photographer: Christopher Frederick Jones

FAR
NORTH
QUEENSLAND
Region

Far
North
Queensland
Region

Far
North
Queensland
Region

Previous
Next

Crystalbrook Bailey

Crystalbrook Bailey was designed around the philosophy of capturing the flavour of Cairns surrounds with an iconic experience, adopting key themes to create a memorable experience with the scale and colour of the rainforest.

The design successfully incorporates the strategies of council’s award-winning Tropical Urbanism Policy. Inspired by the curtain fig tree, a vine like distinctive façade provides shade to the towers which have been kept narrow for ventilation and natural light.
A generous street canopy serves as overarching element tying together the architectural components of public space, semi-public foyer, podium and towers in one rainforest-scale space. The Cairns vernacular is replaced in favour of simple modern lines; re-focusing the experience to lush greenery and feel of the rainforest canopy.

Through sustainable and innovative design solutions, the resultant project is successful in the creation of inviting, versatile spaces which provide a memorable visual experience; creating a new destination for Cairns.

By CA Architects with TPG Architects and ThomsonAdsett with Soul Interior Architecture

Photography by Mark Lane and Gisela Jung

8 Beachfront Mirage

Long term visitors to Port Douglas and keen golfers Helen and Miro Sloup found the last block in Beachfront Mirage with direct access to the Mirage Golfcourse for their new tropical beach house.
“We fell in love with Roger’s concept immediately. Bedroom suite pavilions allow privacy with views of garden or pool, both brilliant.
Flow is remarkable, no hallways.
Living and entertaining areas capturing views whilst finding glimpses of the beach and ocean beyond with separate private retreats throughout, amazing.” Miro said.
Architect Roger Mainwood describing the home as “ long thin double storey, single room width plan, additional single storey pavilions scattered in the garden. This allowed all spaces to be orientated to prevailing breezes with extensive louvred walls, large format doors that disappear or pivot opening to the garden view.”
“ We immediately removed all circulation and stairs to the exterior creating separate tropical, landscaped rooms to pass through.”

By TPG Architects

Photography by Jasmine Axon – Coco & Palm Productions

Previous
Next

8 Beachfront Mirage

Long term visitors to Port Douglas and keen golfers Helen and Miro Sloup found the last block in Beachfront Mirage with direct access to the Mirage Golfcourse for their new tropical beach house.
“We fell in love with Roger’s concept immediately. Bedroom suite pavilions allow privacy with views of garden or pool, both brilliant.
Flow is remarkable, no hallways.
Living and entertaining areas capturing views whilst finding glimpses of the beach and ocean beyond with separate private retreats throughout, amazing.” Miro said.
Architect Roger Mainwood describing the home as “ long thin double storey, single room width plan, additional single storey pavilions scattered in the garden. This allowed all spaces to be orientated to prevailing breezes with extensive louvred walls, large format doors that disappear or pivot opening to the garden view.”
“ We immediately removed all circulation and stairs to the exterior creating separate tropical, landscaped rooms to pass through.”

By TPG Architects

Photography by Jasmine Axon – Coco & Palm Productions

Previous
Next

Newman Catholic College Smithfield

The first Catholic school in Australia co-located on a University campus, founding principal Lauretta Graham said “the architecture permeates every facet. On entering it encourages students and staff to think.
Strong mathematical undertones add to its intrigue making the design perfect for a ‘John Newman school’

Newman, 1801-1889, studied at Oxford. An academic, University Anglican Vicar, converting to Catholicism, patron to construction of new churches, schools, teaching “to reach out towards truth and grasp it.” Becoming a saint in October 2019.

TPGArchitects director, Roger Mainwood said “that same month we completed our first sketch, a four storey, transparent building, allowing views through to mountains and rainforest, reinforcing connection to landscape. Circulation lifted to the first level concourse, reducing travel to two flights up or one down. Stairs, legible, fun, created as sticky spaces for gathering, sitting or learning. Rising through the central vertical commons like an Escher drawing’’ he said.

By TPG Architects

Photography by Andrew Watson Photography and Roger Mainwood

Mundingalbay Yidinji eco-cultural arrival facilities

Ambitious, indigenous eco-cultural projects need to start somewhere and here… “small is beautiful”.
It’s a way that the Mundingalbay Yidinji people can show they’re serious about offering a welcome to their “on country” education and tourism program where they revere the nearby mountain range containing song lines, the “Pyramid”, the “Stingray” and Crocodile”.
The buildings might look simple, (an umbrella and a box?) but they’re designed to contend not just with the lazy crocodile ambling through but also storm surge, unrelenting cyclones and bushfire.
They’re completely “off the grid” and self-sufficient in water harvesting, solar power production, waste treatment and in bringing back biodiversity to the area through endemic plantings.
So, making things look simple may not be simple but the result is two buildings that fit into their settings and give the visitor and awesome “welcome”.
But is it a bird? …. is it a stingray? … it’s whatever imagination allows.

By Philip Follent Architects Pty Ltd

Photography by Andrew Watson, Philip Follent and Mundingalbay Yidinji Aboriginal Corporation

Previous
Next

Mundingalbay Yidinji eco-cultural arrival facilities

Ambitious, indigenous eco-cultural projects need to start somewhere and here… “small is beautiful”.
It’s a way that the Mundingalbay Yidinji people can show they’re serious about offering a welcome to their “on country” education and tourism program where they revere the nearby mountain range containing song lines, the “Pyramid”, the “Stingray” and Crocodile”.
The buildings might look simple, (an umbrella and a box?) but they’re designed to contend not just with the lazy crocodile ambling through but also storm surge, unrelenting cyclones and bushfire.
They’re completely “off the grid” and self-sufficient in water harvesting, solar power production, waste treatment and in bringing back biodiversity to the area through endemic plantings.
So, making things look simple may not be simple but the result is two buildings that fit into their settings and give the visitor and awesome “welcome”.
But is it a bird? …. is it a stingray? … it’s whatever imagination allows.

By Philip Follent Architects Pty Ltd

Photography by Andrew Watson, Philip Follent and Mundingalbay Yidinji Aboriginal Corporation

Previous
Next

Reconciliation Rocks

Reconciliation Rocks is important in demonstrating the evolution of both Queensland and Australian history, as the place where Australia’s first recorded act of reconciliation took place between Aboriginal peoples and Europeans.

Focused on conveying a First Nations Perspective on Australia’s shared history a nationally significant ancestral reconciliation story was brought to life, in a symbolic empowering way.

Along with the granite boulders the two artworks are the heroes of the project, one of the two clan cockatoo feathers, the other a portrait of the peace making elder.
The simple design commemorates the defining moment in our nation’s history allowing the community to learn and reflect on the interaction that took place.

A contemplation space is created, reminding us that “progress doesn’t hinge on race, religion nor class, in this very spot, Cultural Governance & Respect, gave this Nation a blueprint for progression” (Harold Ludwick, National Trust of Australia (Queensland) Cultural Advisor).

By CA Architects

Photography by Gisela Jung, Colyn Huber, Braham Stevens

The Court House

The Cairns Court House was established in 1921 as the home of law and order in the region. In 1992 it was converted into a restaurant and bar. Acquired by Cairns Regional Council in 2016, the Court House has been refurbished to become the focal point of the future Cairns Gallery precinct, performing the function as both an entertainment space and a cultural arts venue.
Constructed at a time before reticulated services or documented building codes, discreet integration of modern building services into the century old building fabric was paramount to the success of the heritage restoration. Elegant integration of services within the existing structure was a result of meticulous coordination with the consultant team.
Traditional materials and building practices have been used alongside modern technologies and materials to compliment the new use of the building and ensure the character of the Court House has been preserved for future generations.

By Clarke and Prince Pty Ltd

Photography by J Create Photography and Clarke and Prince Pty Ltd

Previous
Next

The Court House

The Cairns Court House was established in 1921 as the home of law and order in the region. In 1992 it was converted into a restaurant and bar. Acquired by Cairns Regional Council in 2016, the Court House has been refurbished to become the focal point of the future Cairns Gallery precinct, performing the function as both an entertainment space and a cultural arts venue.
Constructed at a time before reticulated services or documented building codes, discreet integration of modern building services into the century old building fabric was paramount to the success of the heritage restoration. Elegant integration of services within the existing structure was a result of meticulous coordination with the consultant team.
Traditional materials and building practices have been used alongside modern technologies and materials to compliment the new use of the building and ensure the character of the Court House has been preserved for future generations.

By Clarke and Prince Pty Ltd

Photography by J Create Photography and Clarke and Prince Pty Ltd

Previous
Next

Masterplanning for Small Communities - JCU Tropical Urban Design, TUD Lab Studios

A unique collaboration between James Cook University(JCU), FarNorth Queensland Regional Councils, local communities and industry practitioners implementing strategic concept master plans for towns across the Far North
JCU’s Tropical Urbanism Design Lab, TUDLab, have delivered a Design Studio series in Ingham, Innisfail, Ravenshoe and Malanda. JCU Associate Professor Lisa Law said students collaborating with council and industry partners, Gisela Jung of CAA, Andrew Prowse of LA3 and Roger Mainwood of TPG Architects, over the last 7 years have delivered concept master plans for each of the townships that encourages excellence in practice at an individual, industry and community level.
Lisa said “from these workshops and master plans we have seen both significant and simple ideas implemented. In Innisfail a main street has had the traffic direction turned around to achieve better connection to the waterfront; in Ravenshoe street signage has been implemented to tell the story of the area’s history”.

By TPG Architects + CA Architects

Photography by James Cook University TUD Lab, Gisela Jung, Roger Mainwood and TPG Architects

Yarrabah Gateway Building

The Gateway Building in the Yarrabah has been described as a gem in the treasure chest of art and culture that is the Yarrabah Art Precinct. Being a connecting link between the Art Centre and the Menmuny Museum, visitors now have a focal point when they first arrive. From the Gateway Building visitors will have access to tours of the Art Centre and the Menmuny Museum. The steep roof reflects the surrounding mountains and the rooves of existing buildings. Further references to existing buildings such as narrow windows (Art Centre) and round columns (the Canteen) allows the building to ‘fit in’ yet stand out. The opening day festivities were a true celebration of the art and culture that remains strong in Yarrabah and emphasised the important role the Art Precinct plays in the community.

By Indij Architecture & Design

Photography by Indij Design

Previous
Next

Yarrabah Gateway Building

The Gateway Building in the Yarrabah has been described as a gem in the treasure chest of art and culture that is the Yarrabah Art Precinct. Being a connecting link between the Art Centre and the Menmuny Museum, visitors now have a focal point when they first arrive. From the Gateway Building visitors will have access to tours of the Art Centre and the Menmuny Museum. The steep roof reflects the surrounding mountains and the rooves of existing buildings. Further references to existing buildings such as narrow windows (Art Centre) and round columns (the Canteen) allows the building to ‘fit in’ yet stand out. The opening day festivities were a true celebration of the art and culture that remains strong in Yarrabah and emphasised the important role the Art Precinct plays in the community.

By Indij Architecture & Design

Photography by Indij Design

Previous
Next

Midin Clinic Atherton

The Midin Clinic in Atherton raises the bar in the delivery of indigenous health services in the region. A place that is safe and welcoming for First Nations people, Mulungu’s new facility is providing wider community benefits including hi-tech 3D dental imaging. Connection to country is referenced internally and externally through building design and material choices and includes recognition of the rainforests and streams that surround Atherton. The story of the Seven Sisters is acknowledged in the profile of the Training Building roof and the columns for the porte cochere in the Clinic Building. The design allows visual access from internal public spaces to external spaces, and sight lines through the west wing in keeping with cultural surveillance practices. The Midin Clinic provided opportunity for local indigenous artists to display their skills with the possum sculpture, wallpapers and designer textiles all having meaning that connects strongly with Country and/or healing.

By Indij Architecture and Design

Photography by Andrew Watson Photography

Western Cape Communities Trust Administration Centre

The Western Cape Communities Trust (WCCT) represents 11no. traditional owner groups located on western Cape York. They WCCT had long aspired to redevelop culturally significant land on the Embley River waterfront at Evans Landing in Weipa.
The first stage of development is the Administration Centre to facilitate the activities of the Trust, namely a place to ‘meet’, undertake ‘business’ and ‘keep’ important cultural items.
Consultation with the Traditional Owners provided the fundamentals for the design concept; namely a place that embraced the earth, sky and water. The building includes a generous Lobby space and Deck, Large Meeting Rooms and Administrative spaces. The planning seeks to take full advantage of the natural setting with a meandering entrance journey through a Totem Garden up to an elevated floor plate articulated to capture vistas of the river.
CP Architects were engaged by Project Managers Aecom from project inception through to construction stage.

By Clarke and Prince Pty Ltd

Photography by Andrew Watson

Previous
Next

Western Cape Communities Trust Administration Centre

The Western Cape Communities Trust (WCCT) represents 11no. traditional owner groups located on western Cape York. They WCCT had long aspired to redevelop culturally significant land on the Embley River waterfront at Evans Landing in Weipa.
The first stage of development is the Administration Centre to facilitate the activities of the Trust, namely a place to ‘meet’, undertake ‘business’ and ‘keep’ important cultural items.
Consultation with the Traditional Owners provided the fundamentals for the design concept; namely a place that embraced the earth, sky and water. The building includes a generous Lobby space and Deck, Large Meeting Rooms and Administrative spaces. The planning seeks to take full advantage of the natural setting with a meandering entrance journey through a Totem Garden up to an elevated floor plate articulated to capture vistas of the river.
CP Architects were engaged by Project Managers Aecom from project inception through to construction stage.

By Clarke and Prince Pty Ltd

Photography by Andrew Watson

Previous
Next

Gurriny Yealamucka Health & Wellbeing Centre

Gurriny Yealamucka Health and Wellbeing Centre is a new place for primary health and community outreach services on Gunggandji Country in the First Nations community of Yarrabah, Queensland. Gurriny Yealamucka means “Good Healing Water” in the language of the Gunggandji Peoples. This narrative is embedded in the design of the new centre, in its response to Country, and in design features and elements within the building and landscape design. This project demonstrates the power of collaboration between Gurriny Yealamucka Health Sevice, architects, builder, Yarrabah Arts Centre, Gunggandji Rangers, Yarrabah Aboriginal Shire Council and the community to deliver much needed health service spaces in a welcoming, appropriate and iconic design.

By POD (People Oriented Design) with Coburn Architecture

Photography by Scott Burrows and Belinda Allwood

36 ABBOTT ST

A joyous collage of material, craft & geometry, edgearchitecture demonstrates the inextricable relationship between architecture and art, coordinating form, texture, patterns, light and shade. A timeless sculptural facade with the practicality of screening sunlight, manipulating light and shadow, presenting a holistic artwork. A strong intention was for the pattern to change visually as you approach and move around the exterior of the building. A visual delight from a distance and viewing vantage points, enhanced with textured patterns and intriguing details in proximity.

The two storey high street canopy lifting the visual scale along the streetscape, inviting the street rainforest trees to amalgamate with the building. The textured canopy screen and hanging vertical elements presumptive of timeless rainforest elements brought into an urban environment. The footpath vista opening and directing attention to the Cairns Art Gallery and adjoining Courthouse within the “Gallery Precinct”.

By edgearchitecture

Photography by J Create Photography

Previous
Next

36 ABBOTT ST

A joyous collage of material, craft & geometry, edgearchitecture demonstrates the inextricable relationship between architecture and art, coordinating form, texture, patterns, light and shade. A timeless sculptural facade with the practicality of screening sunlight, manipulating light and shadow, presenting a holistic artwork. A strong intention was for the pattern to change visually as you approach and move around the exterior of the building. A visual delight from a distance and viewing vantage points, enhanced with textured patterns and intriguing details in proximity.

The two storey high street canopy lifting the visual scale along the streetscape, inviting the street rainforest trees to amalgamate with the building. The textured canopy screen and hanging vertical elements presumptive of timeless rainforest elements brought into an urban environment. The footpath vista opening and directing attention to the Cairns Art Gallery and adjoining Courthouse within the “Gallery Precinct”.

By edgearchitecture

Photography by J Create Photography