Mary Rice Early Learning Centre | m3architecture | Photographer: Christopher Frederick Jones
2021 QLD State Commendation for Interior Architecture | Mary Rice Early Learning Centre | m3architecture | Photographer: Christopher Frederick Jones

QUEENSLAND SHORTLIST
INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE
Category

Introducing the Shortlist for INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

The following projects have been shortlisted for the 2022 Queensland Architectural Awards, in the Interior Category. This page will continue to list shortlisted project until the last of the 2022 Queensland Regional Events have concluded in Townsville on the 10th of June 2022. The result of the 2022 Queensland Architecture awards will be revealed via livestream, which will be shown at the presentation event on the 24th of June 2022 at the State Library of Queensland, and also available via Youtube.

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BVN Brisbane Studio

IDEA
Our scheme firstly acknowledges the studio as being one part of an extended range of work settings – including work from home. It, therefore, prioritises collective spaces, enabling physical and hybrid interactions that maximise opportunities for knowledge transfer. In addition to classic spaces for face-to-face interactions, the refinement of technology-enabled spaces that allow engagement and collaboration between team members both physically and digitally ‘present’ became an imperative.

TECHNIQUE
Connection to Country is the paradigm at the centre of the spatial arrangements. Settings, tracks, material selections and detail are conceived to remind and amplify this connection, which begins with acknowledgement and celebration of the site’s geology, endemic flora and fauna, along with First Nations occupation.

Surfaces are moulded as though terrain, plantings and material colours are conceived as a palimpsest of original occupation. The presence of the fig grove, along with river glimpses are constant reminders of Country

By BVN

Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones

Citation:

The spread of Covid-19 and subsequent shift to work from home has had a profound impact to the way we think about our inner-city workplaces. The BVN studio charts forward into this new normal and offers a place that promotes connection, health, well-being, and conviviality. Starting with meaningful connection to Country through the pallet of materials, the diversity of spaces is crafted to accommodate informal collaboration, programmed work areas, and in-between spaces. The central organising trellis structure mediates the arrival sequence providing a strong architectonic element within the space, imagining the space of the office as a landscape, rather than an interior. The health and wellbeing benefits of the building is enhanced by the mixed mode conditioning system which provides occupants with a comfortable hybrid indoor / outdoor workspace with an abundance of fresh air, planting, and connection to the adjacent heritage fig tree. The project showcases how hybrid conditioned spaces work and demonstrates their physical and psychological benefits important in our post-pandemic situation. The overall arrangement of space is efficient, open, and democratic. It accepts work from home as the new normal through the careful calibration of space accommodating changes to the population ebb and flow without feeling crowded or empty.  BVN have delivered a project that showcases an alternative approach to high rise commercial office planning and highlights the opportunities for a flexible, healthy, and connected office environment that encourages different modes of working and experiences.

Hyperdome North Mall

The Hyperdome North Mall development renovates and repositions the Northern end of the existing Hyperdome shopping centre with the ambition to claim a central position within Logan and to service a need for a real community anchor, delivering whole of life services and experiences. The design curates vibrant and memorable ‘public’ spaces with an emphasis on space, volume and light. The design nods to the Queensland climate, as pergola-like ceilings and overhead planting recall the lush outdoors.

Within the revitalised mall-scape, new public spaces have been economically designed with curated modes of occupation creating opportunities to dwell, play and to be sociable, whilst circulation has been optimised to support a variety of needs for everyday life admin. A controlled colour selection and relatively humble material palette is used within the precinct to amplify identity, further define public space volumes and nod playfully to the centre’s original 1980’s identity.

By Cavill Architects in association with Sullivan Skinner & Buchan

Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones

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Citation:

Working hard on a limited budget, the architects have successfully developed a suite of design strategies to guide the transformation of the Logan Hyperdome. Previously cluttered and internalised spaces have been opened, stripped back, simplified, and coordinated. The moves afford multiple places for gathering, with landscape interventions reaching out beyond the mall making connections into the greater site. The architect team have exceeded the brief resulting in an exemplary project that transforms the Hyperdome into a more humane and sophisticated community hub.

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Andrew N. Liveris Building

This flagship project for UQ incorporates a range of interconnected spaces with overlapping boundaries between learning, research and industry via a design encouraging a sense of shared discovery and collaboration. The building positions UQ into the future while also playing homage to its past, with a unique energy-efficient glass facade clad in a distinctive transparent veil derived conceptually from the chemical engineering process of turning sandstone into glass – with colours sampled directly from the nearby Great Court. Its compact vertical urban form provides informal learning spaces for students and staff, reclaiming half of the site for landscape spaces. These landscapes are connected to formal and informal student learning spaces visible from the campus via open interconnected ‘pod’ balconies. A central atrium space, derived from the form of the Great Court, links together the learning/research activities of the School of Chemical Engineering into a singular and highly connected collaborative environment.

By Lyons + m3architecture

Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones and Lyons

Citation:

Drawing off The Great Court at the heart of the UQ campus as a key design metaphor, the design conceived by Lyons / M3 offers a playful and colourful response whilst offering an expanded suite of public space for informal gathering within a complex brief of programmed space. Though it is easy to view the colour palette as a trick riffing off the sandstone aesthetic, the clever building organisation creates an expansive public space in the heart of the building, opening what would normally be an internalised and institutional experience. The internal public space colour palette draws upon blues and greens of nature with lab spaces playing off the safety yellow. The generosity of the space and places to meet wrapped in a playful aesthetic are a welcome complement to the on-campus experience, so important in a post Covid context.

Thiess Workplace

The success of the project is the creation of a highly flexible environment which acts as an enabler for sharing and exchanging ideas across the Thiess business. The project has been an exceptional outcome for Thiess and it’s people supporting new ways of working across a diverse workforce.

The workplace is built around a story of ‘transforming landscapes’. Carving and crafting different forms and spaces, extenuating sightlines and viewpoints and creating moments in between these spaces. The collaborative zones and private enclosed spaces are formed around the core creating a series of forms within the space with apertures inviting you into the more private / individual workspace areas.

Visual delight and respite are important aspects of the workspace giving it’s occupants the opportunity to disconnect and then reconnect reinvigorated.

By Cox Architecture

Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones

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Citation:

An exemplary project that authentically reflects an organisation committed to change. A challenging refurbishment within an existing workplace, this project is an example that accommodates change and continuity through the company’s evolving business structure transformation. The tracking of the project’s “story of transforming landscapes” is evident in the well curated variety of work settings, from club like work hubs, to informal collaboration spaces, to open and connected indoor / outdoor social areas uniting the organisation as never before.

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Brisbane South State Secondary College

Brisbane South State Secondary College, the city’s newest vertical campus, offers next level learning connected with the contemporary knowledge network and the country it is bound to – a ridge historically used for camping, weaving and the making of tools by the local First Nations.
Visitors are welcomed within a generous arrival court into a memorable and vibrant central native garden, a magnet for community into the campus. Open galleries across all levels fringe the garden, encouraging interactions and framing views to the surrounding landscape.
Multi-discipline learning hubs are characterised by open and adaptable spaces arranged around double height presentation and making settings in order to share the benefits of education with all.
The architectural language is derived from the First Nations heritage of the site as a place of making, informing the scored details within the concrete facade, as well as harnessing a local palette of colours and materials.

By BVN

Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones

Citation:

An ambitious project that establishes a new narrative around how we occupy and site and how learning occurs. The design’s connection to Country and First Nations occupation in its siting and in details such as the balustrade detailing, façade details, colour palette; invoking a strong connection to place. The openness and connection of spaces that breaks down hierarchies and seeks a more positive engagement between pupils and teachers. The arrangement of interior elements promotes the flow of space with finishes and colour underscoring how spaces are occupied in subtle and beautiful ways.