Reconciliation Prize

2020 Reconciliation Prize Winner Kaunitz Yeung Architecture | Photography: Brett Boardman

About the Prize

Congratulations BVN Architecture FOR KIMBERWALLI

Reconciliation Prize

The Reconciliation Prize seeks to recognise architecture and professional practice in NSW which advances the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait people.

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The 2019 David Oppenheim Award | Parliament of Victoria Members’ Annexe | Peter Elliott Architecture + Urban Design | Vic | Photographer: John Gollings
The 2019 National Award for Public Architecture | HOTA Outdoor Stage | ARM Architecture | Queensland | Photographer: John Gollings
Joynton Avenue Creative Centre and Precinct | Peter Stutchbury Architecture in association with Design 5 - Architects for City of Sydney | Photographer: Michael Nicholson
The 2019 Harry Seidler Award | Dangrove | Tzannes | NSW | Photographer: Ben Guthrie

Background

The 2019 David Oppenheim Award | Parliament of Victoria Members’ Annexe | Peter Elliott Architecture + Urban Design | Vic | Photographer: John Gollings

Purpose

The Reconciliation Prize seeks to recognise architecture and professional practice in NSW which advances the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait people.

The prize shall be awarded to an individual, organisation or collaboration; and seeks to recognise projects, research, practice, or bodies of work which demonstrate one or more of the following qualities:

  • An authentic partnership with, and authorisation of, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Responds to traditional custodianship and the cultural practices, knowledge, history and values of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Encourages the training and employment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Please note that the full body of work of an individual or collaboration based in NSW will be considered beyond state borders, please check the eligibility criteria. 

The Prize also seeks:

  • To increase professional awareness of best practice via an annual key note lecture
  • To raise awareness and positively incentivise practices which promote reconciliation
  • To recognise the value of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural knowledge and its contribution to architecture and professional practice
  • To promote initiatives which show leadership on reconciliation from within the architecture profession to attract more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to consider architecture as a career pathway

Prize

The winning entrant will be awarded a certificate and acknowledged in Institute communications. They will also be invited to deliver a keynote address relating to the awarded work.

Partner

We thank Macquarie Group for their ongoing support of the Reconciliation Prize.

Judging

Evaluation criteria

The appointed jury will evaluate submissions according to how they perform in relation to the following criteria:

  • Achieves an authentic partnership with, and authorisation of, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Responds to traditional custodianship and the cultural practices, knowledge, history and values of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Encourages the training and employment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Has the endorsement of a member of the Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander community it relates to
  • Progresses the rights of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people within the community it relates to
  • Has been undertaken respectfully, has brought positive benefits to the community it relates to, and has considered long term impacts
  • Demonstrates scalable and/or replicable learnings, contributing to the broader goal of reconciliation between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians

In addition to meeting one or more of the criteria above, the entry must demonstrate innovation and/or excellence in the field it relates to (architecture, research, policy, methodology, or practice).

Jury composition

Eligible entries must be received by the closing date or the jury may decide not to award a winner. All entries received by the due date will be assessed by a Chapter-specific jury selected by the NSW Chapter. Jury members will comprise the following people:

  • the NSW Chapter President or nominated representative from the NSW Reconciliation Working Group
  • immediate previous Prize winner, or nominee thereof
  • an architect with an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait islander background
  • interstate/international or an allied discipline expert nominated by the Reconciliation Working Group

The Chapter-specific jury will select one (1) winner, however, the jury may choose not to award a winner if they feel the entries received are not of a high enough standard or do not fulfill the judging criteria.

2021 Jury

  • Callantha Brigham FRAIA 
  • David Kaunitz
  • Bradley Kerr
  • Caroll Go-Sam
The 2019 National Award for Public Architecture | HOTA Outdoor Stage | ARM Architecture | Queensland | Photographer: John Gollings

How to enter

Joynton Avenue Creative Centre and Precinct | Peter Stutchbury Architecture in association with Design 5 - Architects for City of Sydney | Photographer: Michael Nicholson

Eligibility & conditions of entry

The Reconciliation Prize is open to any individual or collaboration that has advanced the recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a significant way through the practice of architecture. The winner is not required to be an architect or a member of the institute, however, the project, collaboration and/or individual contribution being acknowledged must be based in or relate to the practice of architecture in NSW, or the individual or collaboration must be based in NSW.

Submission requirements

Entrants are required to lodge in their application the following:

  • A written statement (max 1000 words) describing:
    1. what the entry project/initiative is
    2. how the entry demonstrates innovation and/or excellence in the field to which it relates (architecture, research, policy, methodology, or practice)
    3. how the entry meets each applicable evaluation criteria
  • Three to five high resolution images including copyright permission for use in Institute produced and/or Institute-related digital and print publications
  • Endorsement of the entry by an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander community representative, either via written statement and/or offer for verbal reference

Should further clarification of the entry be required, the jury may choose to interview shortlisted candidates.

Contact

For more information regarding this prize, please email nsw@architecture.com.au

2021 Reconciliation Prize Winner

BVN

The 2021 NSW Reconciliation Prize is awarded to BVN Architecture for Kimberwalli located on Darug Country, in Mount Druitt, Western Sydney.


Meaning ‘many stars’ in Darug, Kimberwalli has been designed and delivered with self-determination and pride in culture front of mind, reflecting the centre’s objective to create an Aboriginal Centre of Excellence which encourages better learning outcomes and improved career pathways for young Aboriginal people in Western Sydney.


It is an exemplar for reconciliation both in its community leadership, conception, architectural response and the process undertaken to realise the project. A project control group consisting of 8 Aboriginal youth assisted in the development of the project, regular community events were held to engage with community and Aboriginal people were employed throughout project delivery. Architecturally the renewal of two existing brutalist buildings has resulted in a striking outcome for the Centre which has a strong indoor and outdoor presence in the campus.


The buildings are grounded in Country through a fire pit which is pivotal to the journey into the site and forms a cultural heart and gathering space. Reflecting cultural values, demonstrating positive community benefits, authentic partnerships and deep engagement, the Kimberwalli project illustrates what can be achieved when Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are enabled to lead, design and build projects for their communities.

2021 Reconciliation Prize Winner | BVN for Kimberwalli

COMMENDATION: Ngardang Girri KalatMimini(NGKM) in collaboration with Koskela | luk

A commendation is awarded to luk a beautiful pendant light and artwork luk created by Ngardang Girri KalatMimini(NGKM) in collaboration with Koskela, engaged by Gensler on the refurbishment of Ernst and Young (EY) offices.

Responding to EY’s ambition to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture, the lighting piece was designed to reflect the significance of the eel trap and it’s importance to the traditional and artistic practices of Aboriginal people.

Working in partnership with Georgia MacGuire, Aunty Glenda Nicholls, Aunty Lorraine Brigdale and Aunty Janet Bromley (NGKM), Koskela facilitated the creating of luk, which was first conceptualised by First Nations artists through a series of weaving workshops before being faithfully realised by Koskela’s industrial design team.

The project not only delivers on EY’s ambition to celebrate culture, but demonstrates meaningful engagement, authentic partnership and provides positive community benefits. Koskela’s deep level of commitment to realising this project in collaboration with First Nations people is an exemplar for the positive artistic and cultural collaborations which can occur as part of architectural and interior fit out projects.

Commendation 2021 Reconciliation Prize

COMMENDATION: Yarrabah Community and the University of Sydney School of Architecture, Design and Planning | Burri Gummin Housing Studio

A commendation is awarded to the Burri Gummin Housing Studio a collaboration between the Yarrabah Community and the University of Sydney School of Architecture, Design and Planning.


Undertaken on four occasions, the studio is focused on exploring alternate housing typologies for remote Aboriginal communities. Held on Gungganyji land, north East of Cairns, with the generous participation of the Yarrabah community, students are given the opportunity to work directly for the community, obtaining unique insights and cultural perspectives to inform their research and studio work.


This immersive experience is an important opportunity for students to participate in meaningful engagement with Aboriginal people, respond directly to their needs and provides a forum for cultural exchange on Country.


The studio provides an important forum for raising cultural awareness, teaching meaningful engagement, and encouraging students to develop authentic partnerships with Aboriginal communities – all of which will build important professional capacity in our future practitioners.

A commendation is awarded to the Burri Gummin Housing Studio a collaboration between the Yarrabah Community and the University of Sydney School of Architecture, Design and Planning.


Undertaken on four occasions, the studio is focused on exploring alternate housing typologies for remote Aboriginal communities. Held on Gungganyji land, north East of Cairns, with the generous participation of the Yarrabah community, students are given the opportunity to work directly for the community, obtaining unique insights and cultural perspectives to inform their research and studio work.


This immersive experience is an important opportunity for students to participate in meaningful engagement with Aboriginal people, respond directly to their needs and provides a forum for cultural exchange on Country.


The studio provides an important forum for raising cultural awareness, teaching meaningful engagement, and encouraging students to develop authentic partnerships with Aboriginal communities – all of which will build important professional capacity in our future practitioners.

Commendation 2021 Reconciliation Prize

2020 Reconciliation Prize Winner

Kaunitz Yeung Architecture

This is the second year for this relatively new award recognizing inspiring work in the pursuit of equality and equity in architecture. The jury panel was unanimous in awarding the clever and imaginative architectural design outcomes for and with grass roots Indigenous communities and Indigenous makers. The projects contribute to cross-cultural shared learnings that not only meet the aspirations of Indigenous communities, but equally achieve ambitious designs despite the limitations of tight government funding.

Kaunitz Yeung is a small practice with a growing body of projects across vastly different Indigenous communities from red earth deserts to tropical coastal sea islands. Projects spread from Wiradjuri country, (Orange, NSW), to Punmu, Parnngurr, Jigalong and Kunawarritji on Martu country, (Pilbara region -Western desert, WA) and across to Pirlangimpi, (Melville Island in the Tiwi Islands off Darwin, NT). In remote to extremely remote locations, limited budgets can often result in architecture lacking imagination, invention and comprehensive consultation. This is not the case with this practice which has developed a remote building type and dialogue inviting Indigenous artists to create culturally expressive designs. These then become critical elements interwoven into the building’s architectural and cultural identity.

Kaunitz has elsewhere described the substance of the practice’s work is dependent on “….a lot of time in the community not making assumptions, listening to local people and repeating the process, providing forums and both formal and informal opportunities for every voice to be heard.” Of particular note with this recognition and award, inspiring architecture is achievable through in-depth consultation while simultaneously pursuing meaningful outcomes.

2020 Reconciliation Prize Winner Kaunitz Yeung Architecture | Photography: Brett Boardman

2019 Reconciliation Prize Winner

The University of Sydney

Wingara Mura – Bunga Barrabugu (“thinking path to make tomorrow”) strategy   

The University of Sydney Wingara Mura- Bunga Barrabugu Strategy is a visionary, reconciliatory proposition of institutional transformation that activates the design of culturally inclusive and safe physical environments.
The strategy is a unique, exemplary framework for an Australian university setting to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Islander cultures and values and sets a benchmark for the design of space and place.

ex histories and reflect the present state. The role of anticipating the future and determining what story these places will come to tell and how they will continue to support diverse people and communities is an important endeavor. The built environment has an enormous responsibility to connect and provide a good quality of life for all. This pursuit is one that is shared across disciplines and requires the good thinking of many – architects, urban designers, landscape designers and city planners, to produce positive outcomes.

2019 Reconciliation Prize winner University of Sydney, jurors Dillon Kombumerri and Michael Mossman | Photographer: Alexander Mayes