Christopher Procter Prize
urban design and city making research proposal

2020 Christopher Procter Prize winner | Kah Mun Tham | From the Ground Up: COVID + the reinvention of sustainable, resilient intergenerational urban environments post tape markings

About the Prize

Congratulations Kah Mun Tham

The jury were challenged by the high standard of submissions evident in thoughtfulness of topics and worthiness of candidates. Kah Mun Tham’s proposal seeks to delve into the future proofing of social space to achieve equity and inclusiveness across urban and suburban landscapes. It struck a chord with the jury in its recognition of existing issues in metropolitan Sydney and its optimism in seeking to identify applications of relevance to a future Sydney.

Christopher Procter Prize - urban design and city making research proposal

This prize is named after the architect and urban designer Christopher Procter who died suddenly of DVT while arriving back to Sydney in November 2018 from the USA.

Upon graduation in Adelaide in 1986 Christopher won the University of Adelaide (then South Australian Institute of Technology) Medal, the Rod Roach Design Grant and the South Australian Gas Company Prize in Architecture. These enabled him to undertake research and travel that furthered his passion for design.

find out more

The 2019 David Oppenheim Award | Parliament of Victoria Members’ Annexe | Peter Elliott Architecture + Urban Design | Vic | Photographer: John Gollings
The 2019 National Award for Public Architecture | HOTA Outdoor Stage | ARM Architecture | Queensland | Photographer: John Gollings
Joynton Avenue Creative Centre and Precinct | Peter Stutchbury Architecture in association with Design 5 - Architects for City of Sydney | Photographer: Michael Nicholson
The 2019 Harry Seidler Award | Dangrove | Tzannes | NSW | Photographer: Ben Guthrie

Background

The 2019 David Oppenheim Award | Parliament of Victoria Members’ Annexe | Peter Elliott Architecture + Urban Design | Vic | Photographer: John Gollings

Purpose

This prize is named after the architect and urban designer Christopher Procter who died suddenly of DVT while arriving back to Sydney in November 2018 from the USA.

Upon graduation in Adelaide in 1986 Christopher won the University of Adelaide (then South Australian Institute of Technology) Medal, the Rod Roach Design Grant and the South Australian Gas Company Prize in Architecture. These enabled him to undertake research and travel that furthered his passion for design.

The prize has been established for the Institute of Architects in his memory by his wife, architect Bridget Smyth, colleague architect Bill Tsakalos and sponsored by Ethos Urban, where he was a director.  The purpose of this prize is to provide an emerging architect, who has demonstrated a commitment and passion for the design of cities, with the opportunity for research based travel or study to enrich their professional development.

Prize

The award will be $5,000 towards study, travel, and research. The prize must be used within two years of receipt and the recipient will be expected to present the “Prize report” at the annual Christopher Procter Cocktail Party to be hosted by Ethos Urban and will be invited to publish their outcomes and experience in the NSW Architecture Bulletin.

Partners

We thank Ethos Urban and Sydney Community Foundation for their support of the Christopher Procter Prize.

Judging

Evaluation criteria

  1. A proposal for study or research (which may include travel) and how this will enrich professional development; and
  2. Demonstrated excellence in, and commitment to, urban design and city making in the applicant’s completed work (be it project based or written).

Conditions for award

  1. A minimum of three (3) eligible entries must be received by the closing date.
  2. If less than three applications are received by the application deadline the assessment panel reserves its rights to not to award the Prize.
  3. The Prize may not be awarded if the Assessment Panel believes the entries received are of insufficient standard or do not fulfil the judging criteria.

Jury composition

The jury consists of:

  • NSW Chapter President/Chair of Jury or nomination
  • A representative from Ethos Urban
  • A representative from the Procter family
  • A nominated representative (by the President and family) who has demonstrated experience in Architecture and Urban Design

2020 Jury

  • Kathlyn Loseby FRAIA (Chair)
  • Bridget Smyth
  • Stefan Meissner  
  • Bill Tsakalos
The 2019 National Award for Public Architecture | HOTA Outdoor Stage | ARM Architecture | Queensland | Photographer: John Gollings

How to enter

Joynton Avenue Creative Centre and Precinct | Peter Stutchbury Architecture in association with Design 5 - Architects for City of Sydney | Photographer: Michael Nicholson

Eligibility & conditions of entry

  1. Applicants must be within 15 years of graduation.
  2. Applicants must be a current member of the Institute.
  3. Applications must be received ahead of the application deadline.

Key dates

Submissions for the 2020 Christopher Procter Prize have closed.

The jury will review submissions giving high consideration to the uncertainty of when people will again be able to travel safely and extensively and the unpredictability of travel arising from the current COVID-19 global pandemic. 

Submission requirements

Submissions are to be a single PDF document, must not exceed 5MB and must include:

  1. a statement addressing the two key criteria identified above (maximum two A4 pages each including a detailed itinerary should travel be proposed).
  2. a resume (maximum four A4 pages including date of graduation).
  3. a portfolio of works: this can include built and unbuilt work (five A4 pages maximum).
  4. two references (from an employer or client).
  5. a passport sized photo of applicant.

Contact

For more information regarding this prize, please email kat.han@architecture.com.au

2020 Christopher Procter Winner

Kah Mun Tham

From the Ground Up: COVID + the reinvention of sustainable, resilient intergenerational urban environments post tape markings

The jury were challenged by the high standard of submissions evident in thoughtfulness of topics and worthiness of candidates. Kah Mun Tham’s proposal seeks to delve into the future proofing of social space to achieve equity and inclusiveness across urban and suburban landscapes. It struck a chord with the jury in its recognition of existing issues in metropolitan Sydney and its optimism in seeking to identify applications of relevance to a future Sydney. It proposes to do this by exploring the impact of a Covid 19 on a cross-section of metropolitan Sydney; 4 locations exhibiting different demographic and geographic profiles. It is a particularly pertinent subject given the State government’s struggle to deliver place and the dislocating impact of the pandemic.

A process of inquiry will be initiated through manual drawing and digital mapping to lead to propositions around need and intervention clarified through the study of local and international precedent and identified principles. The propositional outcomes will be invested with a clear understanding of the social capital that can be carried in the making of place. Ironically, it renders the pandemic as a ‘positive’ – a contributor to the process of understanding and making relevant public space to a future Sydney.

The proposal resonates with the essence of the very things that drove Christopher Procter’s interest in city making and architecture – a cocktail mix of original subject and thought; pride and willingness to share one’s work; a consistent thread of ideas evidenced in study, practice and fellowship; and, a twist of quirkiness.

Kah Mun Tham is a worthy recipient.

2020 Christopher Procter Prize winner | Kah Mun Tham

2019 Christopher Procter Prize Winner

Hannah Slater

Altogether now: seeking an integrated approach for urban renewal

Cities are the embodiment of life lived, of embedded memory. They tell the tale of complex histories and reflect the present state. The role of anticipating the future and determining what story these places will come to tell and how they will continue to support diverse people and communities is an important endeavor. The built environment has an enormous responsibility to connect and provide a good quality of life for all. This pursuit is one that is shared across disciplines and requires the good thinking of many – architects, urban designers, landscape designers and city planners, to produce positive outcomes.

2019 Christopher Procter Prize winner Hannah Slater, juror Bridget Smyth and Glenn Murcutt | Photographer: Alexander Mayes