RESIDENTIAL
2021 Winner of The Gabriel Poole Award for Building of the Year | Las Palmas | Tim Ditchfield Architects | Photographer: Scott Burrows

Sunshine
Coast
Region

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lakehouse

The Lakehouse was created to grow with the family. Light, airy and spacious this home can accommodate a variety of uses now and into the future. The importance of connection to the landscape and other areas within the house assist in the functionality of the home. Elements of intrigue and surprise are found throughout the home which perfectly reflects the Client’s personality and interests. Robust yet elegant, this home will serve it occupants well and allow for an abundance of family moments to be experienced and fondly remembered.

By Kelly Martin Architecture 

Photography by Corey Schweikert Photography

Ridgewood house

WINNER OF PEOPLE'S CHOICE AWARD

Ridgewood House is located in the Noosa hinterland on approximately 20 acres. Arrival at the house is via a long, undulating track that twists and turns through gullies of original rainforest. The long, north facing linear building that soars over the site celebrates the magnificence of the natural environment. The building is slender with fine edges and large eaves that shelter the occupants from the elements, while having the ability to open completely. Rain water is harvested, an on site waste water facility is included as is solar electricity all contributing to the self sufficiency of the house. A large existing shed on the site was re clad in galvanised iron sheeting and a new covered steel awning was added to unify it with the house. Part of the shed has been repurposed into a ceramicists studio. House materials include steel, glass and concrete, meeting fire rating BAL 40 requirements.

By Robinson Architects

Photography by Nic Granleese

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NOOSA CAR SPA

The Noosa Car Spa offers a very different car wash experience. Located on a busy dynamic triangular site it is a gateway location on the western arrival point to Noosaville. The triangular site strongly influences the building form, bounded by busy service roads which limit the site’s only access point. Our Client desired a high quality landmark that instantly communicates its function but also subtly references the mid-century celebration of the automobile as well as elements of coastal Architecture. It strongly expresses its prefabricated steel structure creating a dynamic building form. The Car Spa offers two fully auto wash bays, two standard self serve bays and a dog wash facility and provides a free flowing easy access experience for the user.

By Andrew Bock Architecture

Photography by Andrew Bock

Cabin In The Woods

Cabin in the Woods is a home nestled within the landscape for a couple wanting to live small, but not tiny. A long narrow structure was created which opposed the slope of the land and as the programme becomes more private in use, the house separates from the ground. Careful planning of spaces allow for the home to expand with guests yet, maintain a cozy feel when it was just the two of them. The result is a space for relaxation and appreciation of the natural setting after a long day of work.

By Kelly Martin Architecture

Photography by Corey Schweikert Photography

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BATH HOUSE

The Bath House project exudes character and personality perfectly reflecting the owner of the property. Through a common understanding and enthusiasm, architect and client worked together to revitalise an original beach house and extend its life expectancy with practical yet elegant solutions.

By Kelly Martin Architecture 

Photography by Corey Schweikert Photography

USC Foundation Building, Moreton Bay Campus

The first building on USC’s new Moreton Bay Campus is a ‘next-gen’ smart campus that’s super flexible for planned growth. Hassell designed the three-story Foundation Building to be built fast to meet demand, accommodating around 1500 students immediately and up to 5000 in the first three years, including science, engineering, allied health, education, law, and business students. A two-storey amphitheatre centralises activity at the heart of the building – supported by adjacent nodes of student and IT services and a 24-hour library. In tune with the broader campus, the Foundation Building encourages use by the community with lecture theatre and large format learning spaces zoned for after-hours events. The building’s deep over-hanging roofs and extensive sun-shading optimise solar performance for a sub-tropical climate.

By Hassell 

Photography by Tom Ross

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Noosa Heads House

Noosa Heads House is a functional, robust and comfortable retreat that attempts to connect its occupants with their coastal setting and celebrate the sub-tropical climate of the region.

While limited in scope, these renovations to an existing brick house have been carefully calibrated to ‘remake’ the experience of occupying the building and to transform the appearance of the existing structure.

By Vokes and Peters 

Photography By Christopher Frederick Jones

AUSTRALIS

Australis is a family house in the Noosa hinterland that responds to the local environment and lifestyle. the architecture was inspired by the original gable roof timber buildings that were located along the Noosa river in the early 1900’s. The single and double gable roof was one of the earliest ‘queenslander’ roof forms, and provides wonderful spaces in and around the house. The home has been designed to encourage a close connection between people and the surrounding natural landscape. The house has been named after the native livingstonia australis palm forests on the property.

By Sealand Architects 

Photography by Emma Bourne

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Mooloolaba Carpark

Mooloolaba is a place of natural riches with a long history stretching back into the dreaming. The natural assets that continue to attract people to Mooloolaba now require functional systems of transport and movement that facilitate improved and successful community use. This carpark forms a significant part of the Council driven, Mooloolaba placemaking strategy.
The architectural language is purposefully simple for such a large structure. An efficient structural base, carefully considered in functional utility, is enveloped by textured façade treatments that are evocative of the Mooloolaba experience and its history, without direct or distinct references.
The building sits comfortably within the predominantly white canvas of the surrounding larger buildings, enabling the simple, yet elegant form to provide sensory relief from a visually confused streetscape. Although functionally a car park, this building provides a visually restrained and welcoming addition to the diverse built environment.

By Blackburne Jackson

Photography By Studio Next

mount mellum house

Two pavilions form an ‘L’ formation around a landscaped courtyard, protecting the home from western sun and inclement winds. The courtyard level matches the original peak of the site. The wet edge swimming pool defines the opposite edge, creating the home’s focus. A space in which to sit or lie outdoors, move through, and to observe from. Landscaping creates a subtle reflection of the greater environment: the pool – ocean; the grass and mounds – plains and hills; the native bushes – distant mountains of the D’Aguilar Range.

This is a home for observing the landscape; its secluded, elevated position offers constantly shifting views of clouds and their play over the ocean, plains, and the ancient monolithic forms of the Glasshouse Mountains. These vistas are available from exposed, dynamic positions where one can be immersed in nature and the greater landscape; or where one can pull back from it and observe in comfort.

By Sparks Architects

Photography By Christopher Frederick Jones

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witta circle

Witta Circle is a heavily landscaped, waterfront, courtyard house that mediates between the opportunities (and constraints) of a site that has its aspect and view on opposing edges. The “C” plan is the intuitive manifestation to this challenge, with the southern edge of the “C”, a transparent, light-filled pavilion offering a transparent and connection to the water’s edge. The concrete skeleton provides a robust base to the charred timber cap that expresses itself as a “shoji” screen to the north, while the southern edge is defined by a landscaped “fringe” that adorns the house. This is a house of two personalities, with an introverted street facade and an extroverted relationship to the Noosa River. The materials, form, skylights and planning all centre and celebrate the sense of being riverfront and how best to engage with it in a casual, enduring way.

By Shaun Lockyer Architects 

Photography By Christopher Frederick Jones

Minyama Island Residence

Minyama Island Residence is positioned in an island precinct with deep water ocean access, northern aspect overlooking Mooloolah River and Mooloolaba Wharf.

Both levels of the residence are connected via large openings within the wood form concrete walls. Openings can be open and shut via operable barn style timber sliding doors.

These doors allow each room to be combined or closed for privacy, heating, and cooling of the residence.

The architecture is softened by use of natural timber against wood form concrete walls, transparent door and window infills offering a warm living environment, capturing views beyond the property.

Suspended balcony floors are suspended over protected living spaces below offering alternative external living spaces in all weather conditions.

The residence is elevated via the pool and pool terrace podium offering protection from river floods. The lower turf terrace connects the residence to the river’s edge.

By Morriarchi Architecture

Photography By Lucas Muro

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Montessori International College 2020-2040 Master Plan

Montessori International College’s (MIC) place vision is to be a green school, responding to the unique assets and ecological constraints of the site, whereby the place becomes a learning resource for children and the community. MIC relocated its school campus from Sippy Downs to Forest Glen in 2015. The original masterplan (2012) catered for the needs of a modest, small school capped at a student population of 420.
A MIC Master Plan review was required to ensure strategic alignment between the organisational vision, financial model, and place vision for the college, and to formulate the long-term design strategies to guide eco-efficient development and biophilic architecture for the next 20-year time horizon. The MIC 2020-2040 vison is to be a Village of Learners with a capped population of 850 students.
Campus site planning optimises biodiversity conservation, land rehabilitation and building orientation northwards for natural daylighting, ventilation, and subtropical thermal passive design.

By PlaceSense

Photography By Phillip Daffara