2021 WInner of The Walter and Oliver Tunbridge Award for Building of the Year | James Cook University Central Plaza | Cox Architecture and Counterpoint Architecture in association | Photography: Cox Architecture

North Queensland
Region

North Queensland
Region

North Queensland
Region

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Anelay

Anelay is a living and lifestyle development which provides a first class offering in Townsville, combining high-end living with activated and dynamic public spaces to create an entertainment and lifestyle destination. The unique development caters for both public and private uses.

Positioned on the corner of The Strand and Kennedy Street, the development’s feature is the 2-storey bar & eatery, entertainment and lifestyle destination. The family friendly facility combines multiple kitchens and casual food options, bars, kids areas, and a spectacular outdoor roof terrace which blend together to create an all-day buzzy atmosphere suitable for all members of the public to enjoy.
The rear of the lot includes a 7-storey apartment development with uninterrupted views of the ocean; a design which will redefine high-end apartment living in Townsville. The building is enveloped in glass to encourage transparency, with other facades softened with vertical greenery to suit the permanent accommodation style.

By CA Architects

Photography by Andrew Rankin

Potters House Redevelopment

The transformation of this heritage listed 1922 church into a modern office space and residence, has ensured the survival a important piece of Townsville architecture. The Larrazabal’s purchased the building after seeing it fall into disrepair.
Potters house is comprised of two separate buildings. The office sits within the church and the design created an open and collaborative workspace. The Board room pod is the focus of the space and creates a private space for meetings and houses the staff kitchenette.
With more freedom in the rear hall, the ceiling was removed exposing the roof framing, creating a two storey space. This gave the opportunity to create a mezzanine bedroom. The original ceiling and vents were retained in the main bedroom as snapshot of the original hall.
The purchase and renovation of Potters house means it will remain an important part of the heritage stock of buildings in Townsville.

By i4architecture

Photography by Andrew Rankin

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Potters House Redevelopment

The transformation of this heritage listed 1922 church into a modern office space and residence, has ensured the survival a important piece of Townsville architecture. The Larrazabal’s purchased the building after seeing it fall into disrepair.
Potters house is comprised of two separate buildings. The office sits within the church and the design created an open and collaborative workspace. The Board room pod is the focus of the space and creates a private space for meetings and houses the staff kitchenette.
With more freedom in the rear hall, the ceiling was removed exposing the roof framing, creating a two storey space. This gave the opportunity to create a mezzanine bedroom. The original ceiling and vents were retained in the main bedroom as snapshot of the original hall.
The purchase and renovation of Potters house means it will remain an important part of the heritage stock of buildings in Townsville.

By i4architecture

Photography by Andrew Rankin

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Proserpine Administration and Local Disaster Coordination Centre

The Proserpine Administration Building offers Whitsunday Regional Council a significant opportunity to deliver a welcoming and engaging civic building for their community in the heart of Proserpine. A central spine links the key functions to improve access and flow between each of the clusters. The key functions of the Building are to accommodate the Whitsunday Regional Council Administration, the Local Disaster Coordination Centre and the Climate Change Innovation Hub.
The collocated functions offer WRC optimal flexibility for regular usage of periodic but essential facilities, therefore the spaces need to be designed for people utilising the spaces each day without compromising the necessary functions during coordinating activities.

By Conrad Gargett

Photography by Riptide Creative

The Oasis Townsville

Approximately 500 people each year decommission from the Australian Defence Force and re-enter civilian life within Townsville. The ambition for The Oasis Townsville is to address the transitional ‘middle ground’, between a life in the Services and integration into the broader community, by providing facilities and affording connections to support programs and to one another; a home base for the Veteran Community.
The Oasis has been conceived as a porous Campus. The focus has been upon the creation of a low-stress environment, with latent capacity, to support a broad range of public and private interactions. The project draws upon the potency of the dry tropical landscape and interstitial spaces to provide impromptu opportunities to voice vulnerability.
Townsville is a Garrison City; the palimpsests of WWII and the military are found embedded throughout its fabric. The architecture at The Oasis operates as an artifice which encodes this local knowledge.

By Counterpoint Architecture with Phorm architecture + design

Photography by Andrew Rankin

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The Oasis Townsville

Approximately 500 people each year decommission from the Australian Defence Force and re-enter civilian life within Townsville. The ambition for The Oasis Townsville is to address the transitional ‘middle ground’, between a life in the Services and integration into the broader community, by providing facilities and affording connections to support programs and to one another; a home base for the Veteran Community.
The Oasis has been conceived as a porous Campus. The focus has been upon the creation of a low-stress environment, with latent capacity, to support a broad range of public and private interactions. The project draws upon the potency of the dry tropical landscape and interstitial spaces to provide impromptu opportunities to voice vulnerability.
Townsville is a Garrison City; the palimpsests of WWII and the military are found embedded throughout its fabric. The architecture at The Oasis operates as an artifice which encodes this local knowledge.

By Counterpoint Architecture with Phorm architecture + design

Photography by Andrew Rankin

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Calvary Christian College - Hospitality & Super Staff + Science & External Works

Fulton Trotter Architects has worked with Calvary Christian College since 2010. Both projects have been completed within the Calvary Christian College Master Plan (2011) also developed by the architects in collaboration with the College.
The Hospitality &Super Staff (completed in 2020) is a purpose designed new building, whilst the Science Centre and Covered Walkway (completed in 2021) is an adaptive re-use of an existing building that, was well-constructed, however outdated.
The language of both buildings is derived from the previous four stages at the College. A new covered walkway was included to an existing visually unsatisfying external space between two buildings. Its form mirrors the language of the wrap and flap additions to the science centre adjacent.
The final outcome has resulted in a unique precinct of buildings and spaces between, that have a continuous flow and create something that is greater than the sum of individual parts.

By Fulton Trotter Architects

Photography by John Hay