2021 Winner of The JW Wilson Award for Building of the Year | Waltzing Matilda Centre | Cox Architecture | Photographer: Christopher Frederick Jones

Central Queensland
Region

Central Queensland
Region

Central Queensland
Region

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Muttaburrasaurus Interpretation Centre

This project’s ideas are generated from the Prehistoric and the community of Muttaburra’s existing focus on its paleontological past – specifically the chance discovery that uncovered the Muttaburrasaurus Langdoni approximately 60 years ago.

The primary driver for the design was to integrate the building as a direct extension of the landscape in lieu of a structure sitting atop the landscape. Local gidgee stone berms conceal the gabion framework and interior creating a sense of intrigue and discovery. The gabions act as retaining walls for the rock berm creating the ovate plan form with a clear spanning steel framed / sheeted roof structure over the interior.

The structure deliberately obscures the life size replica from the entry path and only affords a full view once traversing its threshold into the core creating a greater sense of scale and intrigue for the visitor with the interior’s pared back materiality & rawness reflecting the prehistoric epoch.

By Brian Hooper Architect

Photography by Lisa Alexander

Rocks Bar & Restaurant

A collaborative design approach between Architect, Interior designer & Artist was instrumental in achieving a truly unique and sophisticated hospitality venue for tropical Queensland. The rich palette of materials and their composition together with the food and drink offering provide an elegance not experienced previously in regional Central Queensland. Creating a sense of awe at the threshold whilst simultaneously radiating a level of comfort with a relaxing vibe and warm atmosphere, the fitout affords patrons an opportunity to relax or socialise.

The Rocks cleverly utilises the tenancy space and adds a layer of storytelling through the narrative of the ceiling feature. The Rocks Restaurant & Bar is a memorable dining and lounge experience that commands new and return clientele.

By Brian Hooper Architect

Photography by Mindi Cooke

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Rocks Bar & Restaurant

A collaborative design approach between Architect, Interior designer & Artist was instrumental in achieving a truly unique and sophisticated hospitality venue for tropical Queensland. The rich palette of materials and their composition together with the food and drink offering provide an elegance not experienced previously in regional Central Queensland. Creating a sense of awe at the threshold whilst simultaneously radiating a level of comfort with a relaxing vibe and warm atmosphere, the fitout affords patrons an opportunity to relax or socialise.

The Rocks cleverly utilises the tenancy space and adds a layer of storytelling through the narrative of the ceiling feature. The Rocks Restaurant & Bar is a memorable dining and lounge experience that commands new and return clientele.

By Brian Hooper Architect

Photography by Mindi Cooke

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Kingsley College - Tree House

The Tree House Block, consisting of a Science Lab, Flexible Learning Area and Outdoor Learning Space. The design prioritised difference/harmony and emphasised the connection between past and present.

To create harmony with the existing 80-year old buildings, the extension reflects elements by using off-set gabled roofs and wide verandahs, while also incorporating a modern approach using large glass windows, high ceilings and more connection to the outdoors. The extension focuses on simplicity, using both simple material and construction methods to create modern, functional learning spaces.

Built on flood prone land, the extension is raised above ground on concrete pillars. Above the pillars, the extension uses timber walls and roof framings. The outdoor learning area is designed to showcase a historic tree, emphasising the school’s connection with nature and its history. The stakeholders were passionate about maintaining the existing landscape and drawing attention to the mature trees around the campus.

By Design + Architecture

Photography by Scott Burrows

Long House

Envisaged as a modern take on a rural barn, Long House maximises natural ventilation and provides a practical, durable home that fits the acreage context. Meeting the client’s requirement for a home in which they can age in place, the design offers flexibility for spaces to be used for different purposes as needs change, while still being a cost-effective and simple initial construction.

The use of zincalume steel and fibre cement cladding, combined with the clean and simple form of the home reference agrarian building typologies such as shearing and machinery sheds and challenges the suburbanisation of semi-rural residential developments. The interior design features blocks of bold colour contrasting against the otherwise minimal material palette to emphasise the form of the home, particularly the long hallway that defines the space.

By Tomas O’Malley Architect

Photography by Paul Beutel

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Long House

Envisaged as a modern take on a rural barn, Long House maximises natural ventilation and provides a practical, durable home that fits the acreage context. Meeting the client’s requirement for a home in which they can age in place, the design offers flexibility for spaces to be used for different purposes as needs change, while still being a cost-effective and simple initial construction.

The use of zincalume steel and fibre cement cladding, combined with the clean and simple form of the home reference agrarian building typologies such as shearing and machinery sheds and challenges the suburbanisation of semi-rural residential developments. The interior design features blocks of bold colour contrasting against the otherwise minimal material palette to emphasise the form of the home, particularly the long hallway that defines the space.

By Tomas O’Malley Architect

Photography by Paul Beutel

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Woodgate House

Fronting the beach in the quiet seaside village of Woodgate, this alteration/addition involves a full renovation and extension to allow the former holiday house to function as a comfortable permanent residence. The existing kitchen, living and utility spaces have been reconfigured and an ensuite, dressing room and luxurious “bath house” added within a new pavilion at the rear of the home. Travertine floors throughout and tadelakt (Moroccan plaster) finishes provide a base for the material palette that is full of character and ties together the original building with the contemporary extension.

By Tomas O’Malley Architect

Photography by Paul Beutel

Boatshed - Emu Park SLSC

Designed with the harsh seaside conditions in mind, the Emu Park Life Saving Club Boatshed and Amenities upgrade features a range of clever building techniques. All measures have been put in place to minimize ongoing maintenance and day-to-day costs.

Minimising the need for maintenance was a priority for the stakeholder. Clever design techniques including low-maintenance materials were used in the design of the boat shed and amenities. Construction materials consists primary of concrete blockwork, timber and aluminium sheeting. Extensive design decisions were made to avoid any materials that would rust or require maintenance like steel or glass. Building layout and shape allows for natural ventilation and light and fixed louvres with fly screens allows the building to ‘breath’ at all times (instead of a traditional sealed building). A new breezeway access and unique signage create a prominent street façade and sense of place for the club.

By Design + Architecture

Photography by CamMurchisonPhotography

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Boatshed - Emu Park SLSC

Designed with the harsh seaside conditions in mind, the Emu Park Life Saving Club Boatshed and Amenities upgrade features a range of clever building techniques. All measures have been put in place to minimize ongoing maintenance and day-to-day costs.

Minimising the need for maintenance was a priority for the stakeholder. Clever design techniques including low-maintenance materials were used in the design of the boat shed and amenities. Construction materials consists primary of concrete blockwork, timber and aluminium sheeting. Extensive design decisions were made to avoid any materials that would rust or require maintenance like steel or glass. Building layout and shape allows for natural ventilation and light and fixed louvres with fly screens allows the building to ‘breath’ at all times (instead of a traditional sealed building). A new breezeway access and unique signage create a prominent street façade and sense of place for the club.

By Design + Architecture

Photography by CamMurchisonPhotography