Land 121 Facilities Project, Lavarack Barracks | BVN | Photographer: Scott Burrows
2021 QLD Award Winner for Commercial Architecture | Land 121 Facilities Project, Lavarack Barracks | BVN | Photographer: Scott Burrows

QUEENSLAND SHORTLIST
COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURE
Category

Introducing the Shortlist for COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURE

The following projects have been shortlisted for the 2022 Queensland Architectural Awards, in the Commercial Category. This page will continue to list shortlisted project until the last of the 2022 Queensland Regional Events have concluded in Townsville on the 10th of June 2022. The result of the 2022 Queensland Architecture awards will be revealed via livestream, which will be shown at the presentation event on the 24th of June 2022 at the State Library of Queensland, and also available via Youtube.

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Queensland Fire and Emergency Services South Western Regional Headquarters

The QFES South-Western Headquarters is a prototype facility for regional Queensland. It operates as a Regional Operations Centre during disasters, receiving and analysing information and relaying it where needed, as well as providing administrative support, a triple-0 call centre and fire station.
Co-locating agencies has improved efficiency through sharing of intelligence, resources, and common facilities. This design succeeds giving each agency autonomy as well as opportunities to communicate, develop rapport and a shared culture.
The site and future development nearby were key drivers for architectural expression. It is sympathetic to its current rural context yet fits with the proposed industrial/commercial that will ultimately dominate.
Landscaping and the relationship with the building played an important part in grounding the facility into its environment while integrating opportunities to learn about indigenous fire-stick farming practices. This ties the facility to the landscape, first nations and current users making it a true community building.

By Sims White Architects

Photography by Salt Studios

Citation:

QFES South-Western Headquarters operates as a Regional Operations Centre for disasters response sympathetic to its rural context. An emphasis on co-locating previously disparate government agencies SES, RFS & QFRS has resulted in an accomplished building that responds to its future context. The centre is robust, allowing for efficiency, functionality and future flexibility.  Designed to sit comfortably in a romantic position within the landscape of rolling paddocks yet also fit within the future industrial development earmarked for the area. The floor plan reflects the organisational structure of the client, it is both exceptionally well resolved to create separate and distinct zones for each sub-unit whilst also promoting co-operation and team cohesion. The internal spaces are well organised around intersecting view axis which promote a clear and logical journey throughout the building. The outlook from generous office spaces is of the landscape, with framed views to the horizon, and carefully positioned shading devices to temper solar exposure and glare. Its grounded position in the rural landscape and relationship to the land is further considered with a ceremonial fire pit and acknowledgment of Indigenous fire-stick farming practices. The successes of this project are significant, memorable and are exemplar of a regional architecture that is rigorous enough to combat client briefs of great complexity within expansive majestic landscape settings. 

Noosa Car Spa

The Noosa Car Spa offers a very different car wash experience. Located on a busy dynamic triangular site it is a gateway location on the western arrival point to Noosaville. The triangular site strongly influences the building form, bounded by busy service roads which limit the site’s only access point. Our Client desired a high quality landmark that instantly communicates its function but also subtly references the mid-century celebration of the automobile as well as elements of coastal Architecture. It strongly expresses its prefabricated steel structure creating a dynamic building form. The Car Spa offers two fully auto wash bays, two standard self serve bays and a dog wash facility and provides a free flowing easy access experience for the user.

By Andrew Bock Architecture

Photography by Andrew Bock

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Citation:

Noosa Car Spa embodies the mid-century celebration of the automobile. A constrained triangular site defines the architectural response in both form and material to provide a functional resolution and clearly articulated architectural proposition. A building in the round, the program adeptly resolves coordination of site constraints and engineering services in a gestural roof form to create a permeable structure. The organising strategy is utilitarian yet elegantly articulated in a butterfly skillion roof falling to a wide-pan box gutter that collects and reuses water on site and houses solar panels. The subtropical response to climate and context is a civic gesture that evolves the typology beyond the standard architectural response.  

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Timber Tower

The Timber Tower is an experimental project and the first non-residential building in Australia to use locally grown and manufactured mass timber. The project was developed in direct response to challenges of limited build time, limited site, fixed floor area, and the construction challenges of an occupied and operational site. The fully fabricated approach to structure and building systems allowed for “just in time” construction. The 5-level structure was erected in 28 days and the building, including the integrated fitout for 90 staff was completed within 7-months. It is the first tall building to utilise CLT as the primary vertical structure. This increases the useable column free floor area with the added benefit of providing a more solid façade, providing a very efficient building envelope. The resulting effect of exposed timber structure, small intimate column free floor plates, and generous windows produces a completely new typology for the commercial office.

By KIRK

Photography by Scott Burrows

Citation:

This beautifully executed 5-storey cross laminated timber structure was erected in less than a month through methodically planned prefabrication techniques, a true demonstration of innovative decarbonisation in the building process and the added end of life benefits. Innovatively drawing on Residential construction techniques and materials has given the building a real warmth and familiarity, extending the use of timber through to door frames, joinery, and wall linings. All your senses become engaged by the intimate, column free and exposed timber structure. The generous windows fill each of the spaces with gentle southern light and you begin to get excited by what could be a completely new typology for the commercial office. With almost 360-degree views across Brisbane Airport and beyond it is hard not to be seduced by the strength of presence and grounding beauty of this unique structure nestled within a highly restricted and complex environment

The Eaves, West Village

The Eaves is a striking retail and eatery building in the award-winning West Village development, on the site of the former Peters Ice Cream Factory in Brisbane’s West End. Surrounding a magnificent fig tree, the building is notable in its use of intricate timber and brickwork patterning to create flow, light and shade. The building pays tribute to the site’s heritage – particularly the neighbouring masonry buildings – and Brisbane’s subtropical climate.

By bureau^proberts

Photography by Scott Burrows and Christopher Frederick Jones

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Citation:

West Village is a collection of rich architectural expression, street retail, landscape, and local culture. This building responds to the context and successfully finds a comfortable home amongst its neighbours. There is humility in the sensitive acknowledgement to its surroundings. The terracotta veil shares a delightful dialogue with its ‘older’ brick companions, while protecting the façade from the western aspect. The landscaped ‘island’ adjacent the entry further fosters the relationship with the existing landscape, which is some respects could be viewed as the connective tissue for this precinct. Each elevation responds differently, so it avoids the sense of a single commercial building, but a series of relaxed and appropriate edges which sit harmoniously in this environment. 

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Nettletontribe brisbane studio

Originally a bulk store constructed for Henry Berry & Co, in 1913. 85 Bowen street is a Brisbane landmark, previously occupied by the Little Tokyo restaurant for over 40+ years. nettletontribe identified the opportunity to relocate and transform the space into a modern working environment.

The open plan studio is arranged to create flexible working zones and meeting spaces designed for casual inter-office communication or structured formal meetings. Set over two levels on a sloping site, a cantilevered stair and linear skylight were inserted to a create connection between the work zones.

The completed project has created a vibrant new architectural studio space for nettletontribe that is lively and engaging. The workspace is an active environment based on the principles of collaboration and consultation. Placing the focus on social connections and staff interactions. The renewal has revealed and celebrated the materiality of the original building to reinvigorate the Spring hill streetscape.

By nettletontribe

Photography by Cameron Topping and Erika Kunde

Citation:

A structure, or possibly several structures, dilapidated and convoluted with decades of multiple renovations have been rationalized into a delightful two-level studio environment that demonstrates successfully how existing buildings of this typology can find a new life, while maintaining the fabric and texture of its past. There is’ light ‘touch present, allowing clarity of the volumes with the simple steel stair inserted to connect the two levels. The movement to the upper level allows the individual to intimately engage with the masonry, the roof framing and an elegant junction that allows natural light to wash this area. The upper level shares a wonderful relationship with the side street, with a space that fosters staff interaction in the workplace.

Hyperdome North Mall

The Hyperdome North Mall development renovates and repositions the Northern end of the existing Hyperdome shopping centre with the ambition to claim a central position within Logan and to service a need for a real community anchor, delivering whole of life services and experiences. The design curates vibrant and memorable ‘public’ spaces with an emphasis on space, volume and light. The design nods to the Queensland climate, as pergola-like ceilings and overhead planting recall the lush outdoors.

Within the revitalised mall-scape, new public spaces have been economically designed with curated modes of occupation creating opportunities to dwell, play and to be sociable, whilst circulation has been optimised to support a variety of needs for everyday life admin. A controlled colour selection and relatively humble material palette is used within the precinct to amplify identity, further define public space volumes and nod playfully to the centre’s original 1980’s identity.

By Cavill Architects in association with Sullivan Skinner & Buchan

Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones

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Citation:

The Hyperdome North Mall Expansion by Cavill Architects in association with Sullivan Skinner & Buchan, imparts a newfound sense of calm to a frenetic urban shopping environment. Surprising and unexpected public spaces providing unpredictable and generous amenity to visitors of the centre. Architectural interventions bring increased value to Hyperdome’s commercial offerings, whilst weaving the shopping experience back into the immediate urban context. Cavill Architects, Sullivan Skinner and Buchan’s design, with intelligent use of a limited budget and thoughtful, inspired design detailing reminds the jury of the opportunity for considered, generous and delicate design in everyday settings.

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GURRINY YEALAMUCKA HEALTH & WELLBEING CENTRE

Gurriny Yealamucka Health and Wellbeing Centre is a new place for primary health and community outreach services on Gunggandji Country in the First Nations community of Yarrabah, Queensland. Gurriny Yealamucka means “Good Healing Water” in the language of the Gunggandji Peoples. This narrative is embedded in the design of the new centre, in its response to Country, and in design features and elements within the building and landscape design. This project demonstrates the power of collaboration between Gurriny Yealamucka Health Sevice, architects, builder, Yarrabah Arts Centre, Gunggandji Rangers, Yarrabah Aboriginal Shire Council and the community to deliver much needed health service spaces in a welcoming, appropriate and iconic design.

By POD (People Oriented Design) with Coburn Architecture

Photography by Scott Burrows and Belinda Allwood

Citation:

The building has been designed to fit with the “country”…the sand dune, beach, wetland and tropical ranges behind. The various approaches into the courtyard and through windows provide views to these vistas, which are significant to the people of the area. The spaces provide an inviting environment, which in turns has encouraged an increase in local first nations people attending the clinic. The design, materials and surfaces are relatable to the local community and appear to provide comfort and acceptance. Various functionalities of the centre have been considered in the design for cultural awareness, such as the number of entrances/exits to maintain that personal comfort and privacy when required. The building provides a social and cultural consideration which creates a sense of community pride and ownership. The landscape design includes significant trees and plants that are associated with the local people and considers waiting spaces available to the different families and cultural groups

36 ABBOTT ST

A joyous collage of material, craft & geometry, edgearchitecture demonstrates the inextricable relationship between architecture and art, coordinating form, texture, patterns, light and shade. A timeless sculptural facade with the practicality of screening sunlight, manipulating light and shadow, presenting a holistic artwork. A strong intention was for the pattern to change visually as you approach and move around the exterior of the building. A visual delight from a distance and viewing vantage points, enhanced with textured patterns and intriguing details in proximity.

The two storey high street canopy lifting the visual scale along the streetscape, inviting the street rainforest trees to amalgamate with the building. The textured canopy screen and hanging vertical elements presumptive of timeless rainforest elements brought into an urban environment. The footpath vista opening and directing attention to the Cairns Art Gallery and adjoining Courthouse within the “Gallery Precinct”.

By edgearchitecture

Photography by J Create Photography

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Citation:

This project successfully activates and enhances a Cairns Gallery Precinct encompassing the Old Court House.  It addresses the street providing a welcome scale that opens up to the greenspace of the Court House and Cairns Art Gallery Building. The custom articulated screen is an artistic and iconic lightweight solution in lieu of a-once-existing large masonry wall.   The internal spaces are visually stimulating and intertwine via an internal stair with “green wall”, collage of materials and other artistic parameters. The building showcases a future for community and individual artistic endeavours through boutique serviced spaces using state-of-the-art technologies. Overall, 36 Abbott can be defined as refurbishment project that beholds layers of material, craft and forms recalling the relationships between art and architecture.  

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WESTERN CAPE COMMUNITIES TRUST ADMINISTRATION CENTRE

The Western Cape Communities Trust (WCCT) represents 11no. traditional owner groups located on western Cape York. They WCCT had long aspired to redevelop culturally significant land on the Embley River waterfront at Evans Landing in Weipa.
The first stage of development is the Administration Centre to facilitate the activities of the Trust, namely a place to ‘meet’, undertake ‘business’ and ‘keep’ important cultural items.
Consultation with the Traditional Owners provided the fundamentals for the design concept; namely a place that embraced the earth, sky and water. The building includes a generous Lobby space and Deck, Large Meeting Rooms and Administrative spaces. The planning seeks to take full advantage of the natural setting with a meandering entrance journey through a Totem Garden up to an elevated floor plate articulated to capture vistas of the river.
CP Architects were engaged by Project Managers Aecom from project inception through to construction stage.

By Clarke and Prince Pty Ltd

Photography by Andrew Watson

Citation:

Through extensive engagement with the WCC traditional owner groups, this project successfully develops the value of embracing holistic cultural narratives through the buildings siting, its landscape and integration in the architecture and interiors. Totems to the landscaped forecourt represent the various indigenous groups of the region through imagery and hierarchical placement. The building’s planning allows for adaptable and flexible reuses for optimal efficiency. All rooms appear light and airy with large windows that frame the surrounding landforms and connection to country. The building is a “beacon in the landscape”, unchallenged which further elicits its importance and empowerment to the local indigenous peoples. Careful consideration provided to material selection for the harsh marine environment, maintenance and cultural influences. Overall, an extremely well-thought-out project which has successfully navigated its way through the various challenges of building in the remote robust Cape York region.

THE OASIS TOWNSVILLE

Approximately 500 people each year decommission from the Australian Defence Force and re-enter civilian life within Townsville. The ambition for The Oasis Townsville is to address the transitional ‘middle ground’, between a life in the Services and integration into the broader community, by providing facilities and affording connections to support programs and to one another; a home base for the Veteran Community.
The Oasis has been conceived as a porous Campus. The focus has been upon the creation of a low-stress environment, with latent capacity, to support a broad range of public and private interactions. The project draws upon the potency of the dry tropical landscape and interstitial spaces to provide impromptu opportunities to voice vulnerability.
Townsville is a Garrison City; the palimpsests of WWII and the military are found embedded throughout its fabric. The architecture at The Oasis operates as an artifice which encodes this local knowledge.

By Counterpoint Architecture with Phorm architecture + design

Photography by Andrew Rankin

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Citation:

A place for Veterans to come and meet, the Oasis Townsville is central to and connected with the local community. Repurposed from a Dept. of Primary Industries facility, the site has historic connections to WWII that is reflected in elements of the design. The facility provides a transitional ‘middle ground’ between life in the Services and re-integration into the broader community. It provides facilities and connections to support programs and each other – a home base for veterans and their community.

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PROSERPINE ADMINISTRATION AND LOCAL DISASTER COORDINATION CENTRE

The Proserpine Administration Building offers Whitsunday Regional Council a significant opportunity to deliver a welcoming and engaging civic building for their community in the heart of Proserpine. A central spine links the key functions to improve access and flow between each of the clusters. The key functions of the Building are to accommodate the Whitsunday Regional Council Administration, the Local Disaster Coordination Centre and the Climate Change Innovation Hub.
The collocated functions offer WRC optimal flexibility for regular usage of periodic but essential facilities, therefore the spaces need to be designed for people utilising the spaces each day without compromising the necessary functions during coordinating activities.

By Conrad Gargett

Photography by Riptide Creative

Citation:

The new Proserpine Administration and Local Disaster Coordination Centre reflects Prossie’s local aesthetic through intuitive design that also addresses the cyclonic impacts that destroyed the previous facility. Conrad Gargett’s informed local knowledge and understanding of the community, industry and region is evident, and shines in the civic-minded solutions demonstrated in this building. The open-air gallery extending across the front of the building reflects traditional Queensland verandahs and transitions movement from the street, opening to a full-height foyer and administrative spaces. The building is an interface between Council services and the public while also providing visitor information, outdoor seating, and indoor meeting space available to the public. Conrad Gargett have used durable materials in ways that maintain transparency and connection to the public. The building houses the Whitsunday Regional Council offices and the Local Disaster Coordination Centre while the middle provides building services and back-of-house areas. Additional workspaces and Council Chambers are placed either side of outside edges, providing natural light and pedestrian connection. Design has ensured local building skills utilisation and employment. The Centre has provided the community with a landmark building along with a place for administration and coordination, which will serve the community into the future.