Shortlisted projects give public spaces personality

Five projects have been shortlisted for the new City of Sydney Lord Mayor’s Prize,
established to recognise design excellence in the public domain across central Sydney.

Lord Mayor Clover Moore said the prize was designed to encourage projects that improve
the quality of the public domain, making the city more liveable, interesting and engaging.
‘We need to celebrate the imaginative, innovative and inspiring design that gives our city its
personality,’ the Lord Mayor said.

In the running are: The Art Gallery of New South Wales Forecourt Upgrade by Johnson
Pilton Walker; Darling Quarter by Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp (fjmt) with ASPECT
Studios and Lend Lease; Newtown Interchange by Caldis Cook Group in association with
the NSW Government Architect’s office; The Wayside Chapel by Environa Studio; and
VSQ2 by Tony Caro Architecture.

‘These projects accentuate the quality of our open spaces and urban environments,’ the
Lord Mayor said.

‘Each one makes the most of its urban backdrop, creating wonderful open spaces to be
discovered and enjoyed.’

The winner of the first Lord Mayor’s prize will be announced as part of the 2013 NSW
Architecture Awards this month on 27 June.

Australian Institute of Architects’ NSW Chapter President, Joe Agius, said the prize was an
exciting addition to the annual NSW Architecture Awards and an opportunity to celebrate the
work of architects as place makers and collaborators within the city.

‘This prize recognises architects and projects that, through their creativity, have played a key
role in bringing new life and texture to a range of places across the city,’ Mr Agius said.
Mr Agius said the City of Sydney had been a leading advocate of architecture during Clover
Moore’s time as Lord Mayor.

‘The Institute is pleased to have developed this new prize in close collaboration with the
Lord Mayor and senior Council staff, and I recognise and thank my predecessor Matthew
Pullinger for the key role he played in helping to make this prize a reality.’